Porch of the Maidens (Caryatid Porch)

Porch of the Maidens (Caryatid Porch), Erechtheion, Acropolis, Athens. 421-405 BCE.

The Porch of Maidens consists of six stately caryatids (carved figures functioning as columns). They stand in a pose characteristic of Classical figures. Each caryatid’s weight is supported on one engaged (straight) leg, while the free leg, bent at the knee, rests on the ball of the foot. The vertical fall of the drapery of the caryatids resembles the fluting of a column shaft.

The Porch of Maidens is an example of classical Greek architecture. It was constructed between 421 BCE and 405 BCE. This architecture is a part of an ancient Greek temple, Erechtheion, which is located on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens in Greece. These caryatids act as supporting columns. Each sculptures are slightly different from each other. The Porch of Maidens expresses a sense of stability as well as a sense of relaxed grace and effortless support. Therefore, I feel that this piece of architecture should be on the B-List.

By Jenny Liang

Tags:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.